Lean Execution > Advanced Lean Manufacturing > OEE, Downtime, and TEEP

OEE, Downtime, and TEEP

We have received several inquiries regarding equipment down time – periods of time when the machine is not scheduled to run.  We consider this to be scheduled down time or idle time and does not affect Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), since no production was planned during this period.

OEE measures overall equipment effectiveness during planned production or SCHEDULED up time.  Do not confuse idle time with tooling or material change over as these activities should be part of the scheduled machine time – periods where the machine is not scheduled to run.  After hours or weekends are examples of idle time.

TEEP or Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance is another variable, similar to OEE, and measures the Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance based on calendar time – the total time the equipment is “present”.  If process “A” is in your plant for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, then the total time required to make good parts is divided by the time the asset, process, or equipment is “present” and is therefore “technically available” for the time frame being considered.  Typically this is based on calendar time – 24 hours per day and 7 days per week.

Another way to view TEEP is to consider it as a measure of how effectively the total capacity of a process or machine is being utilized to make GOOD parts.  In short, TEEP could be defined as a measure of Equipment Capacity Utilization Effectiveness.

TEEP Calculation Example:

In the metal stamping business, raw coil steel is processed through a die that runs in a stamping press to manufacture the parts.  The ideal cycle time for may be 30 strokes (or parts) per minute.  While the press may be scheduled to run for 16 hours, it is technically “present” or available 24 hours.  If, in a given day, a total of 18,000 GOOD parts were produced over 16 hours of scheduled production time, the OEE is easily calculated.

We will first calculate the IDEAL hours required to produce 18,000 parts at 30 spm.  The IDEAL rate per hour is 1,800 parts (30 spm * 60 minutes  / hour).  Therefore the IDEAL time to produce 18,000 good parts is 10 hours (18,000 parts / 1,800 per hour).

If this is a two shift operation, the net available time is 16 hours (scheduled) and the OEE for the day is calculated as 10 / 16 = 62.5 %.

Since the press is always present, 24 hours per day – 7 days per week, the Daily Equipment Effectiveness Performance (DEEP) in this case is 10 / 24 = 41.7 %.  While this example only represents a single 24 hour day, the basis for calculation is the same.  If the time frame is one week, one month, one quarter, the Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance for that time frame is calculated using the following formula:

TEEP = Total IDEAL Time to Produce Good Parts / Total Gross Time Available

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Feel free to leave any comments or send your questions to LeanExecution@gmail.com

Until next time – STAY Lean!

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Posted in Advanced Lean Manufacturing, Availability, Lean Metrics, OEE: Overall Equipment Efficiency, Performance, Process Control and OEE, Training, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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2 Pings/Trackbacks for "OEE, Downtime, and TEEP"
  1. […] detailed explanation for calculating DEEP can be found in one of our earlier posts, “OEE, Downtime, and TEEP.”  Understanding machine utilization patterns may provide greater insight into the actual versus […]

  2. […] original posts “Calculating OEE – The Real OEE Formula With Examples” and “OEE, Down time, and TEEP” where we also present methods to calculate both OEE and TEEP.  The formula for Overall […]

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